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Jequirity (Abrus precatorius)



Interactions

Jequirity/Drug Interactions:
  • AnthelminticsAnthelmintics: In vitro, extracts of stem and root from Abrus precatorius demonstrated activity against tapeworms (7).
  • AntibioticsAntibiotics: In vitro, Abrus precatorius (L.) Fabaceae extract exhibited antimicrobial effects against Staphylococcus aureus, with an MIC of 8mcg/mL for the leaf extract (8). Extract from the stem and seed oil were potent against some Gram-positive bacteria and Candida albicans, but not against Streptococcus anginosus, Enterococcus faecalis, and Gram-negative bacteria tested. AP 3 isolated from Abrus precatorius exhibited antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus A (9; 10).
  • Anticoagulants and antiplateletsAnticoagulants and antiplatelets: In vitro studies suggest that Abrus precatorius seeds may have inhibitory effects on platelet aggregation and interact additively with antiplatelet drugs (6).
  • AntidiabeticsAntidiabetics: In streptozotocin-induced diabetic Wistar rats, administration of the aqueous extract of Abrus precatorius (100mg/kg and 200mg/kg of body weight) resulted in significant reduction (p<0.05) in blood glucose levels and prevented the decrease in body weight observed in diabetic rats compared with nondiabetic controls (35). This may suggest an additive effect between Abrus precatorius and antihyperglycemic agents. Further research is needed to confirm this finding.
  • AntihistaminesAntihistamines: In vitro, the abruquinones A, B, D, and F of Abrus precatorius L. showed strong antiallergy effects (6).
  • AntihypertensivesAntihypertensives: Abrus precatorius seeds may cause hypertension and may interact with antihypertensive medications, according to one case report (51).
  • Anti-inflammatory agentsAnti-inflammatory agents: In vitro, the abruquinones A, B, D, and F of Abrus precatorius L. showed strong anti-inflammatory effects (6). In rats, arthritis induced by an injection of croton oil into the paw was decreased in rats treated with the water extract of the leaves of Abrus precatorius, as evidenced by a reduction in the inflammation of the paw (13). Polymyxin-B-induced hind-paw edema and 48/80-induced ear edema were suppressed by abruquinone A, an isoflavanquinone isolated from Abrus precatorius (14).
  • AntilipemicsAntilipemics: In streptozotocin-induced diabetic Wistar rats, administration of the aqueous extract of Abrus precatorius (100mg/kg and 200mg/kg of body weight) decreased streptozotocin-induced increases in serum total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triacylglycerol levels; levels approached those of the control rats (35).
  • AntimalarialsAntimalarials: In vitro, methanol extracts from the seed of Abrus precatorius exhibited moderate activity against Plasmodium falciparum (42).
  • AntineoplasticsAntineoplastics: In vitro and in animal models, several constituents of Abrus precatorius have demonstrated antitumor effects (17; 19; 18; 20; 21; 22; 23; 89; 24; 25; 26; 27; 28; 29; 30).
  • AntiparasiticsAntiparasitics: In vitro, lectins from Abrus precatorius caused common agglutinin reactions in stocks of Trypanosoma cruzi and T. rangeli (15).
  • AntiviralsAntivirals: Abruquinone G, a constituent of Abrus precatorius, demonstrated mild antiviral activity (31). Further details are not available at this time.
  • Fertility agentsFertility agents: Abrus precatorius seed extract administration to female rats resulted in a reversible disruption in the estrous cycle and completely blocked ovulation (84). Furthermore, administration of Abrus precatorius prevented implantation following mating with known-fertile male rats. During pregnancy in previously treated rats, decreased fetal growth was observed. In male rats treated with Abrus precatorius, degenerative effects were observed in the testicular weights, sperm count, later stages of spermatogenesis, and Leydig cells in testes (85). These changes were correlated with decreases in the enzyme activity of 3-alpha,3-beta,17-beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, sorbitol dehydrogenase, and leucine aminopeptidase. In male albino rats, oral administration of a 50% ethanol extract of Abrus precatorius seeds (250mg/kg) caused absolute infertility and suppression of sperm motility (86; 87).
  • Gastrointestinal agentsGastrointestinal agents: According to case reports, ingestion of jequirity seeds may cause cramping, nausea, vomiting, and severe diarrhea (possibly bloody) (3; 2; 1; 52).
  • Hepatotoxic agentsHepatotoxic agents: Abrus precatorius seeds may cause necrosis of hepatocytes and have additive effects with hepatotoxic drugs, according to animal studies (57).
  • ImmunostimulantsImmunostimulants: In animal studies and in vitro, constituents of Abrus precatorius have demonstrated various immunomodulating properties (36; 37; 38; 39; 90; 23; 91; 92; 93).
  • ImmunosuppressantsImmunosuppressants: In animal studies and in vitro, constituents of Abrus precatorius have demonstrated various immunomodulating properties (36; 37; 38; 39; 90; 23; 91; 92; 93).
  • NephrotoxinsNephrotoxins: Abrus precatorius seeds may cause necrosis of renal convoluted tubules and have additive effects with nephrotoxic drugs, according to animal studies (57).
  • Neurologic agentsNeurologic agents: Crude extracts of the leaves of Abrus precatorius inhibited concentration-dependent and reversible acetylcholine-induced contractions of both toad rectus abdominis and rat phrenic nerve-diaphragm muscle preparations (94). Cerebral edema (2), acute demyelinating encephalitis (53; 52), progressive central nervous system depression (53), and raised intracranial pressure (ICP) following ingestion of Abrus precatorius seeds (54) have been noted in case reports.
  • Pulmonary agentsPulmonary agents: Pulmonary edema, pulmonary hemorrhage, edema, and emphysema (51) have been noted in case reports.
  • Vascular agentsVascular agents: In vitro, in aortas of cholesterol-fed rabbits, Abrus precatorius agglutinin exerted a marked stimulatory effect on (45)Ca and (32)Pi deposition (95).

Jequirity/Herb/Supplement Interactions:
  • AnthelminticsAnthelmintics: In vitro, extracts of stem and root from Abrus precatorius demonstrated activity against tapeworms (7).
  • AntibacterialsAntibacterials: In vitro, Abrus precatorius (L.) Fabaceae extract exhibited antimicrobial effects against Staphylococcus aureus, with an MIC of 8mcg/mL for the leaf extract (8). Extract from the stem and seed oil were potent against some Gram-positive bacteria and Candida albicans, but not against Streptococcus anginosus, Enterococcus faecalis, and Gram-negative bacteria tested. AP 3 isolated from Abrus precatorius exhibited antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus A (9; 10).
  • Anticoagulants and antiplateletsAnticoagulants and antiplatelets: In vitro studies suggest that Abrus precatorius seeds may have inhibitory effects on platelet aggregation and interact additively with antiplatelet drugs (6).
  • AntihistaminesAntihistamines: In vitro, the abruquinones A, B, D, and F of Abrus precatorius L. showed strong antiallergy effects (6).
  • Anti-inflammatoriesAnti-inflammatories: In vitro, the abruquinones A, B, D, and F of Abrus precatorius L. showed strong anti-inflammatory effects (6). In rats, arthritis induced by an injection of croton oil into the paw was decreased in rats treated with the water extract of the leaves of Abrus precatorius, as evidenced by a reduction in the inflammation of the paw (13). Polymyxin-B-induced hind-paw edema and 48/80-induced ear edema were suppressed by abruquinone A, an isoflavanquinone isolated from Abrus precatorius (14).
  • AntilipemicsAntilipemics: In streptozotocin-induced diabetic Wistar rats, administration of the aqueous extract of Abrus precatorius (100mg/kg and 200mg/kg of body weight) decreased streptozotocin-induced increases in serum total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triacylglycerol levels; levels approached those of the control rats (35).
  • AntimalarialsAntimalarials: In vitro, methanol extracts from the seed of Abrus precatorius exhibited moderate activity against Plasmodium falciparum (42).
  • AntineoplasticsAntineoplastics: In vitro and in animal models, several constituents of Abrus precatorius have demonstrated antitumor effects (17; 18; 19; 20; 21; 22; 23; 89; 24; 25; 26; 27; 28; 29; 30).
  • AntiparasiticsAntiparasitics: In vitro, lectins from Abrus precatorius caused common agglutinin reactions in stocks of T. cruzi and T. rangeli (15).
  • AntiviralsAntivirals: Abruquinone G, a constituent of Abrus precatorius, has demonstrated mild antiviral activity (31). Further details are not available at this time.
  • Fertility agentsFertility agents: Abrus precatorius seed extract administration to female rats resulted in a reversible disruption in the estrous cycle and completely blocked ovulation (84). Furthermore, administration of Abrus precatorius prevented implantation following mating with known-fertile male rats. During pregnancy in previously treated rats, decreased fetal growth was observed. In male rats treated with Abrus precatorius, degenerative effects were observed in the testicular weights, sperm count, later stages of spermatogenesis, and Leydig cells in testes (85). These changes were correlated with decreases in the enzyme activity of 3-alpha,3-beta,17-beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, sorbitol dehydrogenase, and leucine aminopeptidase. In male albino rats, oral administration of a 50% ethanol extract of Abrus precatorius seeds (250mg/kg) caused absolute infertility and suppression of sperm motility (86; 87).
  • Gastrointestinal agentsGastrointestinal agents: According to case reports, ingestion of jequirity seeds may cause cramping, nausea, vomiting, and severe diarrhea (possibly bloody) (3; 2; 1; 52).
  • Hepatotoxic herbsHepatotoxic herbs: Abrus precatorius seeds may cause necrosis of hepatocytes and have additive effects with hepatotoxic drugs, according to animal studies (57).
  • HypoglycemicsHypoglycemics: In streptozotocin-induced diabetic Wistar rats, administration of the aqueous extract of Abrus precatorius (100mg/kg and 200mg/kg of body weight) resulted in a significant reduction (p<0.05) in blood glucose levels and prevented the decrease in body weight observed in diabetic rats compared with nondiabetic controls (35).
  • HypotensivesHypotensives: Abrus precatorius seeds may cause hypertension and may interact with antihypertensive medications, according to symptoms in one case report (51).
  • ImmunomodulatorsImmunomodulators: In animal studies and in vitro, constituents of Abrus precatorius have demonstrated various immunomodulating properties (36; 37; 38; 39; 90; 23; 91; 92; 93).
  • NephrotoxicsNephrotoxics: Abrus precatorius seeds may cause necrosis of renal convoluted tubules and have additive effects with nephrotoxic drugs, according to animal studies (57).
  • Neurologic agentsNeurologic agents: Crude extracts of the leaves of Abrus precatorius inhibited concentration-dependent and reversible acetylcholine-induced contractions of both toad rectus abdominis and rat phrenic nerve-diaphragm muscle preparations (94). Cerebral edema (2), acute demyelinating encephalitis (53; 52), progressive central nervous system depression (53), and raised intracranial pressure (ICP) following ingestion of Abrus precatorius seeds (54) have been noted in case reports.
  • Pulmonary agentsPulmonary agents: Pulmonary edema, pulmonary hemorrhage, edema, and emphysema (51) have been noted in case reports.
  • SennaSenna: The combination of 0.5% Abrus precatorius seed and 2% Cassia senna fruit in the diet of Lohmann broiler chicks caused severe lesions, reduced weight gain, inefficient feed utilization, and anemia (78). It took up to two weeks following withdrawal of the diet before tissue recovery was complete.
  • Vascular effectsVascular effects: In vitro, in aortas of cholesterol-fed rabbits, Abrus precatorius agglutinin exerted a marked stimulatory effect on (45)Ca and (32)Pi deposition (95).

Jequirity/Food Interactions:
  • Insufficient available evidence.

Jequirity/Lab Interactions:
  • Blood pressureBlood pressure: Abrus precatorius seeds may cause hypertension and may interact with antihypertensive medications, according to symptoms in one case report (51).
  • GlucoseGlucose: In streptozotocin-induced diabetic Wistar rats, administration of the aqueous extract of Abrus precatorius (100mg/kg and 200mg/kg of body weight) resulted in a significant reduction (p<0.05) in blood glucose levels (35).
  • Liver function testsLiver function tests: Abrus precatorius seeds may cause necrosis of hepatocytes and could affect liver function tests, according to animal studies (57).
  • Plasma lipidsPlasma lipids: In streptozotocin-induced diabetic Wistar rats, administration of the aqueous extract of Abrus precatorius (100mg/kg and 200mg/kg of body weight) decreased streptozotocin-induced increases in serum total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triacylglycerol levels; levels approached those of the control rats (35).
  • Prothrombin timeProthrombin time: Abrus precatorius seeds may have inhibitory effects on platelet aggregation and change prothrombin time, according to in vitro studies (6).
  • Renal function testsRenal function tests: Abrus precatorius seeds may cause necrosis of renal convoluted tubules and could affect renal function tests, according to animal studies (57).

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The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.

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