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Buckshorn plantain (Plantago coronopus)

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Also listed as: Plantago coronopus
Related terms
Background
Evidencetable
Tradition
Dosing
Safety
Interactions
Attribution
Bibliography

Related Terms
  • Plantaginaceae (family), Plantago coronopus, Plantago coronopus L.
  • Note: This monograph only covers Plantago coronopus; however, other species of Plantago have been referred to as buckhorn plantain (not buckshorn), such as Plantago lanceolata.

Background
  • Buckshorn plantain is found in Europe, western Asia, and northern Africa. The leaves are sometimes used in an Italian salad called misticanza, which means "wild greens." In the Canary Islands, buckshorn plantain has been used to treat kidney and urinary disorders. However, there is insufficient available evidence in humans to support the use of buckshorn plantain for any indication.

Evidence Table

These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. GRADE *
* Key to grades

A: Strong scientific evidence for this use
B: Good scientific evidence for this use
C: Unclear scientific evidence for this use
D: Fair scientific evidence for this use (it may not work)
F: Strong scientific evidence against this use (it likley does not work)


Tradition / Theory

The below uses are based on tradition, scientific theories, or limited research. They often have not been thoroughly tested in humans, and safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. There may be other proposed uses that are not listed below.

  • Antibacterial, kidney diseases, laxative, leukemia, malaria, urinary disorders.

Dosing

Adults (18 years and older)

  • There is no proven safe or effective dose for buckshorn plantain in adults.

Children (younger than 18 years)

  • There is no proven safe or effective dose for buckshorn plantain in children.

Safety

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not strictly regulate herbs and supplements. There is no guarantee of strength, purity or safety of products, and effects may vary. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy. Consult a healthcare provider immediately if you experience side effects.

Allergies

  • Avoid in individuals with a known allergy or hypersensitivity to buckshorn plantain (Plantago coronopus) or its constituents.

Side Effects and Warnings

  • Insufficient available evidence.

Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

  • Buckshorn plantain is not recommended in pregnant or breastfeeding women due to a lack of available scientific evidence.

Interactions

Interactions with Drugs

  • Insufficient available evidence.

Interactions with Herbs and Dietary Supplements

  • Insufficient available evidence.

Attribution
  • This information is based on a systematic review of scientific literature edited and peer-reviewed by contributors to the Natural Standard Research Collaboration (www.naturalstandard.com).

Bibliography
  1. Caldes G, Prescott B, King JR. Potential antileukemic substance present in Globularia alypum. Planta Medica (Germany) 1975;27:72-76.
  2. Darias V, Martin-Herrera D, Abdala S, et al. Plants used in urinary pathologies in the Canary Islands. Pharmaceutical Biology 2001;39(3):170-180.

Copyright © 2011 Natural Standard (www.naturalstandard.com)


The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.

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